Behavioral Sciences (BEHS)

BEHS 505  Homeland Security and Emergency Management  (4 Credits)  

This course presents an overview of the homeland security and emergency management field and enables students entering the profession or expanding their roles to function effectively given a broad array of emergency management issues. This course provides students with a broad view of issues that focus on policy considerations and align with the five National Preparedness System mission areas of prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery. Students learn critical concepts such as the Department of Homeland Security all-hazards approach of emergency management, risk prevention, counter-terrorism, and consequence management and mitigation. This course takes a behavioral science risk-based approach, assessing capabilities and identifying gaps within existing emergency management programs. This approach is instrumental to planning future homeland security and emergency management programs, which facilitate our nation’s ability to improve emergency management. PREREQUISITE: PSY501 or SOC501 or CRIM500 or MGMT500.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Articulate the core concepts of emergency management and their relationship to best practices in emergency management.
  2. Develop an understanding of how the emergency management profession defines itself.
  3. Formulate the elements of integrated teamwork and devise specific actions for improving contributions to emergency management teams.
  4. Apply the behavioral science risk-based approach to emergency management capabilities.

BEHS 510  National Incident Management Systems (NIMS)  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the comprehensive approach guiding the whole community - all levels of government (federal, state, county, and town), nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector - to work together seamlessly to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the effects of emergency incidents. The course provides students with an understanding of National Incident Management Systems (NIMS) concepts, principles, and components. PREREQUISITE: BEHS 505 Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

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  1. Develop a level of understanding to help prepare the nation for catastrophic disasters by uniting all incident personnel, from on-scene responders to individuals in Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs).
  2. Identify how NIMS concepts and principles aim to promote consistency in NIMS implementation across the nation.
  3. Articulate how organizations that have achieved the requirements for NIMS criteria thrive in the nation's all-hazards approach to emergency management.
  4. Design a project-based tabletop exercise, a comprehensive approach that guides the whole community (WC), that represents the unique and diverse needs of a population, including its demographics, values, norms, community structures, networks, and relationships. The WC also includes all levels of government (federal, state, county, and town), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and the private sector.

BEHS 540  Practicum in Behavioral Science  (4 Credits)  

This project-based practicum is an entry-level field experience designed to assist behavioral science majors in exploring career and vocational settings in which they can use and apply their behavioral science knowledge and skills. The nature of the practicum is exploratory, involves extensive initiative in designing and implementing the practicum, and is conducted under the supervision of the practicum instructor. A supplementary objective of the practicum is to explore and assess possibilities for settings and situations in which the student may engage in an upper level behavioral science internship.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 501 Introduction to Psychology or SOC 501 Introduction to Sociology or CRIM 500 Introduction to Criminology. Registration for this course is by permission of the Office of Academic Affairs. Earlier registration deadlines may apply.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Gain knowledge of the relevance of their behavioral science academic training to the work world.
  2. Experientially acquire knowledge related to their major and understand how their behavioral science skills and knowledge fit into the sites visited.
  3. Distinguish between profit and nonprofit organizations that relate to social services and programs involving behavioral science skills and knowledge.
  4. Acquire knowledge of how social services organizations, agencies, and programs are structured, funded, and administered.
  5. Further refine and develop their career aspirations in the behavioral sciences field including locating and assessing an internship site.
  6. Develop knowledge and skills related to involvement in the work world including taking initiative to network, conducting interviews and being interviewed, and promoting their own capabilities and assets in field settings.
  7. Acquire knowledge of career relevance, realities, and opportunities with regard to their behavioral science training including range of salary, benefits, and other compensation.
  8. Follow Granite State College policy that all research activities which involve human participants, regardless of the level of risk foreseen, require review and written approval by the College's Institutional Review Board prior to the initiation of the activity.

BEHS 610  Community Emergency Response  (4 Credits)  

The focus of this course is on disaster preparedness and training and organizing teams that can support communities during disasters. The course provides disaster response process knowledge, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, and disaster medical operations. Community emergency response knowledge is used to develop strategies to protect families, neighbors, and co-workers if a disaster occurs. How to plan, execute, and evaluate disaster preparedness desktop exercises will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s): BEHS 505 Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate the skills needed to effectively manage a community emergency response.
  2. Identify the resources needed and how to obtain those resources to effectively mitigate disaster damage and improve community emergency response.
  3. Describe various emergencies in public health and the organization needed to reduce the threat to the public and mitigate the effects on the population.
  4. Analyze the psychological damage caused by disasters to both the civilian and the first responder, as well as how to mitigate the effects of those disasters.

BEHS 615  Terrorism: Domestic and International  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major issues in the growing threat of domestic and global terrorism. Topics include an overview of the history and development of terrorism, types of terrorism, terrorist groups, the psychology of terrorism, the structure and dynamics of terrorist groups, terrorists' techniques, financing of terrorism, the media and terrorism, legal issues, and terrorism of the future.

Prerequisite(s): BEHS 505 Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Consider the content and contrast between domestic and international terrorism.
  2. Articulate the importance of studying terrorism.
  3. Identify, compare, and contrast distinct types of terrorist groups and summarize the dynamics of terrorist groups.
  4. Apply select emergency management theories to terrorist events and their prevention.
  5. Synthesize the legal issues related to dealing with global terrorism.

BEHS 617  Disaster Management  (4 Credits)  

This course addresses the complexity of issues related to disaster management, including a history of the field, key legislation impacting the field, comprehensive emergency management and integrated emergency management, and current issues in the field. This course explores emergency management systems used to lessen the potential impact of disasters. Approaches related to policy, sustainability, public education, disaster exercises, programming, and the built environment are all considered.

Prerequisite(s): BEHS 505 Homeland Security and Emergency Management OR FSA 605 Fire Service Ethics.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Articulate the foundations of an all-hazards approach to disasters and associated natural/human events.
  2. Discuss disaster management theory.
  3. Describe the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) strategic framework for countering changing threats and existing emergency management strategies, which encompass policy, sustainability, public education, and disaster exercises.
  4. Analyze methods of gaining community involvement as an essential part of successful humanitarian assistance in an all-hazards approach to disaster management. 5.Examine technological innovations in disaster risk reduction, which provide advantages for better disaster mitigation preparedness.
  5. Analyze methods of disaster management by conducting independent disaster management research about a case study, including a data search and trend analysis, and presenting the results of this analysis.

BEHS 640  Internship in Behavioral Science  (4 Credits)  

This course is a field-based internship designed to develop and hone the practical application skills of a Behavioral Science major. Students apply for an internship at a self-selected site and negotiate the terms of the internship experience with a site supervisor under the general auspices of their Granite State College mentor. The internship requires documented evidence of eighty hours of supervised experience and practice in a field setting where behavioral science-related knowledge and skills are applied. NOTE: It is recommended that students have completed the majority of upper level course work in their major prior to enrolling in this course. Registration for this course is by permission of the Office of Academic Affairs. Earlier registration deadlines may apply.

BEHS 650  Integrative Capstone: Project and Research in Behavioral and Social Science  (4 Credits)  

This capstone course in behavioral and social sciences requires students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained from other courses in the program and to demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge to new subject matter and practical situations. Conforming to the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Standards, students will complete an independent project, which includes the written analysis and synthesis integrating theory and practice.

Prerequisite(s): CRIT 602 Advanced Critical Analysis and Strategic Thinking, IDIS 601 Interdisciplinary Seminar, and all major requirements must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Academic Advisor approval is required for registration to be processed. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.
BEHS 651   Integrative Capstone: Internship in Behavioral and Social Science  (4 Credits)  

This capstone course is a field-based internship designed to develop and hone the practical application skills of a Behavioral or Social Science major. The course requires students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained from other courses in the program and to demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge to new subject matter and practical situations. Students apply for an internship at a self-selected site and negotiate the terms of the internship experience with a site supervisor under the auspices of their Granite State College mentor. The internship requires documented evidence of eighty hours of supervised experience and practice in a field setting where behavioral science-related knowledge and skills are applied. NOTE: Registration for this course, an internship, is by permission of the Office of Academic Affairs. Early registration deadlines may apply.

Prerequisite(s): CRIT 602 Conducting Critical Inquiry, IDIS 601 Interdisciplinary Seminar, and all major requirements must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Academic Advisor approval is required for registration to be processed. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.