Management (MGMT)

MGMT 500  Principles of Management  (4 Credits)  

This course examines a wide range of business theories and practical applications related to effective management. In addition to learning about what management is and what managers do, students also explore and assess their own management skills and styles. Students apply critical thinking skills to core business functions. Focus is on contributing factors to management styles such as communication, the role of the manager, design of the organization, ethical issues, social responsibility and globalization. Course format emphasizes the application of these management roles and competencies through experiential activities, group exercises and case analysis.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe and value the scope, role, and function of effective managers in diverse settings in a variety of sectors.
  2. Develop and articulate their own management style and assess how their strengths and weaknesses impact others and the organization.
  3. Identify key management theories and trace their evolution to current management theory and practice.
  4. Compare and contrast current management theories, including their evolution to current management practices.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to work as a member of a team toward achieving a predetermined goal.
  6. Explain four traditional management functions: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.
  7. Assess how planning, organizing, leading and controlling are supported by team building, coaching, communication, presentation, and ethical reasoning.
  8. Apply the four traditional management functions to diverse global contexts.

MGMT 501  Introduction to Public Administration  (4 Credits)  

Analysis of the nature of bureaucracy; recruitment, training, leadership, supervision, and organization of civil servants; public unionism; problems of communication, allocation of resources and public budgeting process; administrative law; and problems of public support.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define public administration.
  2. Identify and discuss alternative bases of organizational theory.
  3. Identify and discuss alternative public sector personnel procedures and policies.
  4. Identify and discuss qualities and techniques of leadership, as well as the limits of leadership.
  5. Identify and discuss alternative budgeting processes and their applications.
  6. Identify and discuss areas of change in public administration: a. Planning b. Management information systems c. Interdepartmental committees d. Study commissions and task forces e. Consultants f. Limits on administrative discretion g. Issues in administrative law
  7. Identify problems with and changes in the role of politics in the bureaucracy.

MGMT 502  Excel  (2 Credits)  

A comprehensive examination of spreadsheet software. Students will build a variety of spreadsheets using simple and complex formulas, functions, graphics, database features, sorts, linkages within spreadsheet and between spreadsheets, and macros.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Algebra and knowledge of computer operating system. This course is valuable for all Business students and Computer Science Students. It provides competency and fluency in the standard software used for business analysis and as a link between large computer software systems and the end user.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Design, build, edit, and format complex and multi sheet workbooks.
  2. Construct basic mathematical formulas, using correct order of operations.
  3. Use simple and conditional formatting of numerical and text data to create readability and professional appearance of the spreadsheet.
  4. Demonstrate principles of good spreadsheet design including planning, documentation, and organization.
  5. Use spreadsheet software to present and analyze quantitative information, to draw conclusions from information, and to evaluate the reliability of those conclusions.
  6. Demonstrate appropriate use of cell references, absolute, relative, and conditional formulas.
  7. Use financial, statistical, mathematical, logical, text, and date functions to build applications.
  8. Demonstrate effective use and formatting of graphs to enhance numerical data in spreadsheets.
  9. Apply database functionality including tables, filtering, sorting, and queries. 1
  10. Import, merge and convert data from external sources. 1
  11. Demonstrate effective use of linkages among multiple spreadsheets, external workbooks, and templates. 1
  12. Understand how to build, apply, and edit macros to automate routine tasks. 1
  13. Create Pivot tables and pivot graphs to show the power of data management.

MGMT 518  Human Resource Administration  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on how human resource managers build effective networks and coalitions with others to accomplish tasks and stimulate motivation, cooperation, and satisfaction among work groups. It develops an understanding of the role and functions of human resource practitioners in a variety of organizational settings. Students build a knowledge base and identify the skills needed in the primary areas of human resources administration including interviewing and selection, employee benefits and total compensation, performance assessment, professional development, workplace safety and wellness, employee relations, collective bargaining, workplace diversity, human resource information systems, rewards and recognition, performance coaching and corrective action, compliance and employment law, and organizational development.

MGMT 540  Practicum in Management  (4 Credits)  

This project-based practicum is an entry-level field experience designed to assist Business Management majors in exploring career and vocational settings in which they can use and apply their business-related knowledge and skills. The nature of the practicum is exploratory in nature, involves extensive student initiative in designing and implementing the practicum, and is conducted under the supervision of the practicum mentor. A supplementary objective of the practicum is to explore and assess possibilities for settings and situations in which the learner may engage in an upper level Business Management Internship.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management. Registration for this course is by permission of the Office of Academic Affairs. Earlier registration deadlines may apply.
MGMT 566  Organizational Behavior  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on practical application of current research and concepts in human behavior in order to understand and analyze organizations. Interpersonal processes, problem-solving, and managerial decision-making are considered through examination of the roles of power, politics, ethics, and conflict in organizations. Topics include individual behavior, motivation and performance, interpersonal relations, small group relations, the role of leadership, and organizational culture.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Articulate an understanding and appreciation of the systems approach as it is applied to human and organizational behavior.
  2. Identify and explain the role of personality and perception affecting behavior in organizations.
  3. Compare and contrast approaches to building employee motivation and performance.
  4. Discuss the importance of groups in organizations and how they can influence organizational decision-making, efficiency, and effectiveness.
  5. Examine the influence of organizational power and politics on managerial decision-making.
  6. Describe the importance of effective communication within organizations.
  7. Evaluate the role and effectiveness of leadership within organizations.
  8. Identify and analyze the impact of globalization on individual, group and systemic functioning within organizations.
  9. Apply ethical decision-making to business practices and principles associated with organizational behavior.

MGMT 568  Strategic Data Analysis  (4 Credits)  

This course explores the effective use of data in organizational strategy and planning. Fundamentals including data-gathering, evaluation of data, and effective communication to multiple stakeholders will be emphasized. The course develops an introductory understanding of the importance of both quantitative and qualitative data. Students identify data relevant to learning in their primary area of interest and determine how such data can be applied to the planning and execution of organizational goals, such as strategic planning, budgeting, and complex projects.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 502 Math for Our World and MATH 504 Statistics.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Understand the importance of data collection and analysis in determining organizational planning, development and execution of strategy, allocation of resources, and assessment of plan effectiveness.
  2. Apply basic skills in data collection and analysis to gain better understanding of the process.
  3. Identify factors which influence and affect the integrity of data collection and analysis and methods to minimize imperfect data.
  4. Utilize data in the strategic planning and decision-making processes.
  5. Develop and communicate findings of data collection and analysis and its interaction with the strategic plan to relevant stakeholders.

MGMT 601  Contemporary Management Issues  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students examine how such issues as globalization, technology, the environment, business ethics, and business-government relations impact how businesses are managed. They also examine how leaders manage leaner and flatter organizations comprised of diverse employees working in teams. Students explore the broad impacts of these contemporary management issues through reading, research, case studies, and active discussions.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management or MGMT 501 Introduction to Public Administration.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify, research, and critically analyze contemporary management issues developments for their impact on the contemporary business environment.
  2. Examine the effect on an organization of current external driving forces such as globalization and technological innovation.
  3. Examine the effect on an organization of current internal driving forces such as empowerment, team building, diversity, and changing organizational structure.
  4. Apply new knowledge of contemporary management issues to the practice of managerial decision-making.
  5. Understand the behaviors essential to productive and positive work groups and participate as an effective member.
  6. Research a topic relating to one of the managerial issues identified in the class and produce a written course project.

MGMT 602  Leadership  (4 Credits)  

This course guides participants in developing lifelong learning skills for leadership that apply to any organizational level in a wide variety of environments. Both historical and current leadership theory and practice are explored. By taking an active leadership role in this course, students examine the issues, challenges, and practical skills of leadership in today's workplace. Presentations, team activities, reflection, interviewing, and feedback which are all examples of developmental components within the course.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 600 Becoming an Effective Leader.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Discuss the history of leadership theory and trace its evolution to current developments in the field.
  2. Contrast current leadership models in the context of contemporary leadership practice in various circumstances.
  3. Justify the potential of leaders as agents of change and vision in organizations.
  4. Use current leadership models as a framework for analyzing leaders within their organizational culture.
  5. Explore the mentor-protege relationship.
  6. Identify and develop personal leadership strengths and areas for self-development.

MGMT 604  The Global Environment of Business Management  (4 Credits)  

Globalization, remote work environments, outsourcing, new technology, supply chains and current business practices require working across time zones, countries, and cultural norms, all of which challenge traditional assumptions about how to manage people and organizations. Students will study how growing worldwide interconnections impact globalization on managing organizations and people worldwide. This course reflects new and emerging individual and interrelated factors influencing international managers which may include legal, political, economic, competitive, socio/cultural, technological, and environmental factors. The class incorporates real-world examples, research, and practical application, allowing students to adjust, adapt, and navigate the changing global business landscape, assessing opportunities and addressing potential challenges.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the major concepts and paradigms in global management, including historical, current best practices and predicted trends.
  2. Develop entry strategies and ongoing management techniques specific to the local culture;
  3. Examine similarities and differences in political, cultural, environmental and economic systems, among nations engaged in international business and trade;
  4. Assess potential opportunities, challenges and strategies for working and managing in an international environment.
  5. Differentiate how managing an international business can differ from managing a domestic business, and the additional skills and knowledge that business managers must possess to be successful in international ventures.

MGMT 605  Fundraising and Resource Development  (4 Credits)  

Fundraising is the act of soliciting for contributions or pledges. Development, on the other hand, refers to nurturing and building relationships over time between donors/philanthropists and organizations. The purpose of this course is to differentiate fundraising, grantwriting, and development strategies in organizations. This course will review ethics and transparency within fundraising, technology to facilitate resource development, social and business trends, and organizational adaptation.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Discuss the purpose of fundraising and development in organizations.
  2. Categorize the individuals within an organization that aid in development.
  3. Examine ethics and transparency in nonprofit fundraising.
  4. Identify fundraising processes, strategies, and sources.
  5. Examine how to motivate, nurture, engage, and maintain donor relationships.
  6. Analyze resource development innovations and potential opportunities for social enterprise.

MGMT 606  Human Resources and Organizational Development  (4 Credits)  

This course explores the role of the human resource professional as facilitator and agent of organizational change and development. It focuses on the behavioral aspects of organizational development in which human resource practitioners must balance their responsibilities to management and to employees. The course addresses such concepts as organizational change, team building, team effectiveness, downsizing/re-engineering, conflict management, the impact of technology, developing internal partnerships and cross-team collaboration, and managing multiple teams. NOTE: MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior is recommended.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Trace the forces from inside and outside the organization that have transformed the role of human resources in the organization.
  2. Use current human resource function models as a framework for analyzing human resources managers within their organizational culture.
  3. Identify and propose strategies to meet the development needs of internal organizational constituents by serving as a problem-solver and process and workforce consultant to employees and management.
  4. Develop skills to be an effective agent of change.
  5. Negotiate between employees and employers for maximum benefit to improve employee and organizational performance.
  6. Experience team-building, collaboration and conflict management roles by developing and facilitating group activities.
  7. Identify personal team-building and leadership strengths and their uses in various circumstances; identify areas for self-development.

MGMT 607  Human Resource and the Law  (4 Credits)  

This course addresses the complexity of employment and labor law and workplace policies. It explores issues such as alcohol and drugs, sexual harassment, privacy rights, wrongful discharge, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), negligent employment practices, and discrimination. Beyond this foundation knowledge, the course uses case studies to demonstrate how human resources managers can apply this knowledge to protect and add value to their organizations.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 518 Human Resource Administration.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify key indicators and sources to research the environment and anticipate changes in laws and regulations relevant to the organization.
  2. Demonstrate strategies for addressing a wide range of various employment laws and employment issues using an analytical approach.
  3. Assess the capabilities and role of internal resources and know when it is appropriate to consult outside council.
  4. Communicate to senior management the need for, and budgetary implications of, compliance.
  5. Experience the role of negotiator among and between employees, employer, and other constituencies.
  6. Identify necessary employee and staff training programs that address workplace policies.
  7. Identify and manage outside resources and expertise necessary to perform certain training, negotiating, or other specialized tasks.

MGMT 608  Fostering Inclusion and Diversity in the Workplace  (4 Credits)  

Today’s workforce is diverse; individuals are frequently interacting with peers, managers and customers, each with different backgrounds, experiences, group affiliations, neurodiversity, sexual orientations, religions, and identities. With equity and respect, these differences can enhance performance and creativity; workplace diversity can also help to increase employee and customer engagement, contentment, and inclusion. This course explores ways in which employees and managers can cultivate an inclusive workplace culture and offers means for expanding appreciation of each individual's uniqueness. This course will also review paradigms that limit and promote inclusion, such as unconscious biases, behavioral change, leadership, acknowledgement of the dimensions of diversity, and enforcement of patterns by employers, employees, and society as a whole. RECOMMENDED: MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Develop language for understanding diversity and inclusion in the workplace.
  2. Evaluate the aspects of one’s identity and personal experiences that shape how they interact and engage with others, and how others interact and engage with them in organizational settings.
  3. Analyze an organization’s current approach to leading diversity and propose ways to enhance learning and effectiveness in that organization.
  4. Identify and evaluate the trends and issues confronting managers that result from increasing workforce diversity and globalization.
  5. Build core competencies required for successful management and leadership in diverse contexts (e.g., the ability to collect, analyze, and synthesize information to make logical and informed decisions).

MGMT 611  Money and Banking  (4 Credits)  

This course examines financial markets and financial intermediaries, and their role in creating and maintaining economic efficiency. It analyzes the performance of banks and other financial institutions and reviews the functions and measurements of money. It also examines and assesses the use of monetary policy tools, targets, and goals within the context of current economic conditions.

Prerequisite(s): ECO 512 Principles of Economics. NOTE: ECO 600 International Economics is recommended.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe how vital financial markets and intermediaries are to a well-functioning economy.
  2. Discuss the functions and aggregate measurements of money in our economy.
  3. Demonstrate increased understanding of the lending process.
  4. Summarize the history of banking and banking regulation in the U.S.
  5. Review the major functions of the Federal Reserve System.
  6. Discuss the increased interdependence of world economies and monetary policies.
  7. Use supply and demand framework to analyze the bond market and interest rates, and differentiate between current yields and rates of return.
  8. Critique the management of a commercial bank, including: asset, liability, liquidity, and capital management, as well as the management of credit and interest rate risks.
  9. Evaluate the contributing reasons for the relative decline of commercial banks, as well as the financial intermediaries gaining in importance. 1
  10. Discuss recent changes in U.S. banking laws and regulations, as well as the rationale for changes. 1
  11. Analyze monetary policy tools, targets, and goals within the context of current economic conditions.

MGMT 612  Investment Principles  (4 Credits)  

This course provides the learner with a thorough overview of investments. Topics include the analysis of investment vehicles (such as stocks, bonds, money markets, and mutual funds), consideration of risk and expected rates of return, time value of money applications, and the principles of asset allocation, risk tolerance, and diversification.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 502 Math for Our World and MATH 504 Statistics.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Understand that there is a tradeoff between risk and return.
  2. Differentiate between different types of investments.
  3. Describe the principles of asset allocation.
  4. Perform time value of money calculations, using formulas, financial tables, financial calculators and/or financial spreadsheets.
  5. Differentiate among and critically evaluate the large variety of investment literature, including newspapers, periodicals, financial websites, prospectuses, and annual reports.
  6. Compare and contrast the major investment vehicles available today, including stocks, bonds, money markets, and mutual funds.
  7. Construct an asset allocation that is consistent with a given risk tolerance profile, target return, and time frame.
  8. Select individual investments with the use of criteria such as investment objectives and risk/reward profiles; historical, expected and required returns; fees and expenses, and expected cash flows.
  9. Calculate present and future values, payoff dates, payments, and rates of return using time value of money techniques, in order to meet investment goals. 1
  10. Relate the concepts reviewed in this course to current economic and investment news.

MGMT 613  Financial Management  (4 Credits)  

A successful financial manager focuses on maximizing shareholder wealth, while also considering other stakeholders such as employees and communities. This course utilizes financial formulas, tables and spreadsheets to focus on the financial functions of analysis, planning and decision-making, and control. Major topics include financial statement analysis and forecasting, working capital policy, cost of capital and capital budgeting techniques, interaction with financial markets, and time value of money techniques.

Prerequisite(s): ACCT 511 Financial Accounting and acceptable scores on Accuplacer in arithmetic and elementary algebra assessments. NOTE: Proficiency in Excel is required.
MGMT 615  Financial Modeling and Decision-Making  (4 Credits)  

This course prepares managers to develop real-world financial models and to interpret financial information for effective business decision-making. It builds upon knowledge in accounting, finance, and economics, and emphasizes the strategic application of such knowledge in the corporate setting. Students employ the tools of analysts to develop their understanding of how managers use financial data to guide decisions and to increase value. Topics include capital budgeting, strategic investments, financial risk, and debt.

Prerequisite(s): ACCT 511 Financial Accounting and ECO 512 Principles of Economics. NOTE: MATH 504 Statistics is recommended.
MGMT 619  Quality Management  (4 Credits)  

This course provides students with understanding and knowledge of the philosophies and methods used to improve effectiveness and efficiency of organizational processes for businesses. Topics include statistical methods for quality improvement in manufacturing and service operations. Emphasis is given to both the technical and managerial issues in understanding and implementing quality as a component for success in today’s global business environment.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management and MATH 504 Statistics

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Understand the philosophies and methods used to improve effectiveness and efficiency of organizational processes;
  2. Apply statistical methods for quality improvement in manufacturing and service operations;
  3. Gain hands-on practice with both the technical and managerial issues in understanding and implementing quality;
  4. Enhance communication and group-management skills;
  5. Understand the critical role of quality management in successful business strategies.

MGMT 620  Effecting Positive Change in Organizations  (4 Credits)  

This course explores the inner landscape of organizational systems with respect to personal, interpersonal, and interactional dynamics that facilitate or impede functionality and affect the change process in organizations. The organizational structure is viewed as the context in which individual, interpersonal, group, organizational, and systemic change is examined. Characteristics of functional and dysfunctional systems are defined, and the change process is delineated. Models, skills, techniques, and strategies for change related to individuals, relationships, groups, management, organizations, and systems are examined. RECOMMENDED: COMM 542 Interpersonal Communication and Group Dynamics or MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the characteristics of functional and dysfunctional organizations.
  2. Articulate the nature and impact of personality dynamics, group dynamics, and system dynamics in an organizational context.
  3. Practice mentoring and accountability partnering processes.
  4. Organize, present, and evaluate a training module on a topic relevant to effecting positive change in organizations.
  5. Learn and apply the consultation process with regard to individual, group, management, system, and organizational issues and problems
  6. Design a training manual composed of resources (information, models, materials, tools, and strategies) that are relevant to addressing change in organizations.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge, methods, and expertise in the following interventive processes: problem-solving, conflict resolution, team-building, strategic planning and action planning.
  8. Employ the skill of process observation in order to serve as a resource in organizational consultation.
  9. Describe and apply the principles of effective group leadership and process in an organizational context.

MGMT 621  Managing Conflict  (4 Credits)  

This course teaches concepts and skills to manage conflict effectively between two people, within small groups, within organizations, and between organizations and systems. It is designed to help those who want to sharpen their ability to understand, manage, and create opportunity out of conflict. As a result of this course, one knows oneself and others better, enhances personal and interpersonal skills, and develops techniques to improve relations at work and at home. For the most part, the class is a laboratory for simulations, working on actual conflict situations through role playing, and practicing new communication skills.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Compare and contrast conflict management styles using theoretical frameworks.
  2. Evaluate the impact of different conflict management styles on situations and individuals.
  3. Diagnose situations and apply theory to analyze conflict through case studies and personal experience.
  4. Describe and evaluate the impact of skills and attitudes on management of conflict, with a focus on collaborative conflict resolution.
  5. Distinguish positions from interests, reframe conflicts as mutual problems to be resolved.
  6. Employ skills in communicating, listening, and using feedback in prevention and/or management of conflict.

MGMT 622  Database Management Systems  (4 Credits)  

This course provides prospective users of data base management systems with a solid theoretical and practical foundation for using these systems in a variety of contemporary organizational environments. The course traces the nature of DBMS from general conceptual structures, through the design, interface and implementation of actual database systems. The course includes a mix of classical database theory with practical hands-on application using state of the art DBMS packages; similar to those used today by large and small organizations alike to run their information systems.

Prerequisite(s): CMPL 515 Programming Fundamentals and CMPL 612 Advanced Software Tools.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe classical database theory and the conceptual structures that underlie database management systems.
  2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the function, role, and structure of database systems from start to finish.
  3. Design, build, modify, normalize, and generate queries (QBE) on database tables.
  4. Design and generate reports for a variety of functional areas of business and facilitate end user access.
  5. Set up interfaces with in-house or point of sale database software.
  6. Understand data security and integrity including back up strategies.
  7. Develop familiarity with both small office database systems (ie.MS Access) and with a “big system” database (Oracle).

MGMT 623  Systems Analysis and Design  (4 Credits)  

This hands-on course introduces students to the role of the systems analyst in the development of information systems for organizations. The systems analyst is a problem-solver. As such, this course emphasizes development of effective solutions and communicating those solutions to the development team. Use of accepted design techniques, project management approaches, written and verbal communication, collaboration and teamwork, and organizational tools prepares the learner for the many demands of an entry-level systems analyst.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 502 Math for Our World, MATH 504 Statistics, and CMPL 612 Advanced Software Tools or CMPL 515 Programming Fundamentals.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Describe the role of systems analyst within the organization.
  2. Discuss the skills required to conceptualize an information system.
  3. Successfully complete the initial analysis, problem definition, requirements definition, process modeling, and design phases of a realistic information systems case.
  4. Communicate the nature and requirements of the information system to all colleagues, regardless of their technology orientation or knowledge, through written and verbal proposals.
  5. Demonstrate the skills required to translate user requirements into concepts understood by designers/technicians.
  6. Use collaborative tools and techniques to function as an effective member of the information technology team in order to achieve system objectives. Of particular importance is the use of Web-based technologies to participate in team activities.
  7. Complete limited prototyping and programming associated with a project.
  8. Design high level database requirements for the information system, and develop the analytical skills necessary to evaluate vendor designs. These requirements include, but are not limited to, conceptual design and logical design documents resulting in entity-relationship diagrams and identification of key attributes.
  9. Present recommendations and findings in a public face-to-face or online forum and facilitate ensuing discussions.

MGMT 624  Managing Information Technology  (4 Credits)  

This course helps students understand the important role of information technology in business strategy. Emphasizing the management of information technology rather than specific technical aspects, students explore the alignment of information technology with organizational goals, efficiencies gained through technology solutions, project management and the implementation of information technology, and organizational and industry changes driven by information technology. Investments in information technology for competitive advantage, the positioning of information technology in the organization, the pace of innovation in a digital economy, and emerging trends in information technology are discussed.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management OR MGMT 501 Introduction to Public Administration OR MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Understand the importance of information technology as inextricable from business strategy and competitiveness.
  2. Review case studies and research from the field to discuss drivers of success and failure in information technology innovation, project management, and business implementation.
  3. Explore the history of technological innovation and its ongoing central role in business and management, from operational efficiency gains to change management paradigms.
  4. Analyze the impact of information technology on specific industries and within the global economy.
  5. Discover emerging trends in information technology and theorize about their potential impact on current practices and assumptions.

MGMT 625  Legal and Ethical Issues in Business Management  (4 Credits)  

This course addresses the nature, functions, and operations of the legal system and how legal rules affect business operations. Students examine the legal framework of laws, rules, health and safety regulations, and judicial opinions that have direct and profound impacts on managerial decision-making and practice. Considerable emphasis is placed on the federal, state, and local regulations that directly impact business practice; consumer laws, labor and employment law, and the social and ethical environment of business policy and management practice.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management OR MGMT 501 Introduction to Public Administration OR MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior.
MGMT 626  Project Management Strategies  (4 Credits)  

This course examines tools and methods used to manage projects of varying size and scope, and explores how these tools can be deployed to plan, schedule, execute, and assess projects from start to finish. Topics include cost, risk, and quality management frameworks. While designed primarily for students in management-related and technology-related fields, the course takes a broad approach, recognizing the diversity of professions which require project management skills and knowledge. Students will be introduced to the roles and responsibilities of project and program managers in various settings, to the knowledge areas of the Project Management Institute, and to the significance of project management teams.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management or MGMT 501 Introduction to Public Management.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Use the appropriate terminology of the project management field to describe stages of projects.
  2. Recognize the Project Management Body of Knowledge areas.
  3. Define the scope of projects.
  4. Explore risk management in relationship to projects.
  5. Develop understanding of project planning and scheduling and predict the impact of change(s).
  6. Employ project budgeting techniques and track costs.
  7. Identify quality management frameworks and describe their value within industry.
  8. Use software tools appropriate to project management.
  9. Identify issues that affect projects across fields. 1
  10. Articulate traits of successful project management, including roles and teams.

MGMT 627  Operations Management  (4 Credits)  

This course analyzes complex operating situations faced by technical and business managers. Students learn the role of the operations manager in the enterprise as well as demonstrate an understanding of the scope of an operations strategy. Students develop operations strategies to meet organizational requirements while analyzing operations processes. The course also offers students an opportunity to apply knowledge that contributes to the operations success of organizations.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Understand the role of the operations manager in the enterprise.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the scope of operations strategy.
  3. Develop operations strategies to meet organizational requirements.
  4. Understand the relationship between operations and other business functions.
  5. Analyze operations processes and related strategies.
  6. Understand the relationship between operations, customers, and the supply chain.
  7. Apply knowledge that contributes to the operations success of organizations.

MGMT 628  Fundamentals of LEAN Process Improvement  (4 Credits)  

This course promotes an understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of LEAN processes, and how LEAN thinking can be applied in a variety of contexts and applications. Students will be exposed to a range of LEAN tools that prepare learners to actively participate in LEAN processes and events in support of the development of a LEAN organizational culture. Developing capacity in facilitation and change management, students will prepare to become LEAN practitioners, learning to guide a group through problem solving circumstances, while considering the challenges of organizational change.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify and explain the forces behind LEAN thinking and process improvement applications.
  2. Summarize the history and development of LEAN in the workplace, in the United States and globally.
  3. Define what is meant by the term "LEAN organization," and explain the major characteristics mentioned in key sources.
  4. Describe the full continuum of the kinds and levels of LEAN process improvement applications that are presently incorporated in one or more major workplaces.
  5. Outline the major components of the LEAN practices within selected organizations including development of 21st century process improvement measures.
  6. Explain the ways in which LEAN process improvement theory inform change and development in the contemporary workplace.
  7. Research and describe "best practice" in LEAN process improvement within an industry or employment field with which the participant is familiar.
  8. Explain the "global" aspect of LEAN organizations that identify themselves as players in this arena.
  9. Explore, analyze, and develop a means of professional preparation for future LEAN process improvement trends.

MGMT 632  Global Innovation  (4 Credits)  

This course recognizes the deep connection between global trade, technology, and innovation. Combining studies in global business and its responsible management with the specialized knowledge of technology and global innovation management gives students the opportunity to prepare for successful careers in a global environment for firms that compete on the basis of innovation in products and services. PREQUISITE(S): MGMT 500 Principles of Management.

MGMT 633  Global Business  (4 Credits)  

This course introduces the concept of global business as a system and the theories which underlie it; institutions that are visual evidences of it; production, marketing, financial, legal, human resource management, culture, politics and other subsystems which comprise the total system. It also examines national governmental and international institutional controls and constraints, which impact the environment in which the system operates. Students will examine growing worldwide interconnections to gauge the impact of globalization on managing organizations and people worldwide. Global business has an impact on all businesses, regardless of size or location of your business.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Explain how the economic, political/legal, and financial environments affect global business operations.
  2. Describe the ways culture affects all business activity.
  3. Identify how geographic features of a country or region contribute to natural capital.
  4. Explain strategies used by business in the competitive international market.
  5. Explain how global businesses differ from domestic business.

MGMT 637  Workplace Coaching  (4 Credits)  

This course engages students to learn and utilize core coaching concepts and methodologies to increase organizational and individual performance in the professional workplace. Differences between coaching and mentoring, coaching dynamics as a performance management tool, the eight steps to coaching for performance, and an array of coaching methodologies appropriate in diverse scenarios shall be explored. Upon completion of this course students are expected to be able to apply coaching methodologies to common workplace scenarios.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior. NOTE: This course is a business coaching course specific to Management and Human Resource Administration majors.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Define how coaching is a key performance management tool within the broader context of organizational development and, specifically, why leadership coaching is critical in succession planning.
  2. Distinguish the difference(s) between coaching and mentoring and workplace generation benefits.
  3. Identify the ethical issues that face internal and external coaches in an organization.
  4. Utilize and apply coaching technique(s) and theories working with individuals in the context of common professional business scenarios.

MGMT 638  Nonprofit Management  (4 Credits)  

This course guides participants in understanding nonprofit organizations and their management. Topics include motivations for starting nonprofit organizations as well as theories and strategies to balance the unique needs of nonprofits within market economies. This course covers considerations for staffing and volunteer management, funding sources, asset management, program evaluation and leadership structures as elements of identifying qualities of successful nonprofit organizations at various stages of development. Projects may include interviewing, building a nonprofit business plan, and presentations.

Prerequisite(s): MGMT 500 Principles of Management or MGMT 566 Organizational Behavior.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Distinguish the unique elements of nonprofit organizations from the for-profit and public sectors in organizational makeup and delivery systems.
  2. Explore the different aspects of management and operations including the supervision of employees and volunteers.
  3. Investigate the historical, philosophical, theoretical and ethical perspectives of nonprofit organizations, including current trends and challenges facing nonprofits.
  4. Describe the various stakeholders in nonprofit organizations and the role of the Board of Directors.
  5. Analyze the importance of strategic planning, fundraising strategies, finances, marketing, and program evaluation within nonprofit organizations.

MGMT 639  Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations  (4 Credits)  

Nonprofit management is becoming a recognized specialty, with a growing number of individuals and entities specializing in nonprofit financial management. Concepts cover financial management considerations related to ethics, governance, policy and mission frameworks that are unique to nonprofit organizations and practices.

Prerequisite(s): ACCT 511 Financial Accounting and MGMT 638 Nonprofit Management.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Model nonprofit management from a financial leadership viewpoint.
  2. Examine discipline-specific concepts in the areas of ethics, governance, policy, and financial management.
  3. Illustrate financial management concepts in a variety of nonprofit settings.

MGMT 640  Internship in Management  (4 Credits)  

The upper level Business Management Internship is a field-based experience designed to develop and hone the practical application skills of a Business Management major. Students apply for an internship at a self-selected site and negotiate the terms of the internship experience with a site supervisor under the general auspices of their Granite State College internship mentor. The internship requires documented evidence of eighty hours of supervised experience and practice in a field setting where business management-related knowledge and skills are applied. NOTE: It is recommended that learners have completed the majority of upper level course work in their major prior to enrolling in this course. Registration for this course is by permission of the Office of Academic Affairs. Earlier registration deadlines may apply.

MGMT 650  Integrative: Strategic Management  (4 Credits)  

This capstone course focuses on the concepts and techniques of business management. It analyzes the process of developing and executing strategies designed to maximize a company's competitive advantage. Students will not only learn how to assess a company's internal and external environments but also the range of competitive strategies available. With this information, students will develop skills to determine the appropriate strategy to fit the company's unique resources and environment. Students in competing management teams will apply these concepts and techniques by crafting and executing strategy in a business simulation exercise. They will also apply their knowledge of strategic management to their own field of professional interest by completing a course project. Students will also be required to submit professional documents such as a cover letter, resume, and professional portfolio as part of the course.

Prerequisite(s): CRIT 602 Advanced Critical Analysis and Strategic Thinking, IDIS 601 Interdisciplinary Seminar, and all major requirements must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Academic Advisor approval is required for registration to be processed. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Examine the process of crafting and executing strategy, and apply that process to case studies, a business simulation, a project, and one's personal brand.
  2. Analyze and evaluate external environmental factors such as competition, industry trends, technology, government regulations, and changing demographics/customer preferences and apply this analysis to case studies and to a business simulation.
  3. Analyze and evaluate a company's resources and competitive position by examining organizational strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) and by value chain analysis to assess competitiveness of prices and costs. Learners will apply this analysis to case studies and to a business simulation.
  4. Evaluate generic competitive strategies and integrate all relevant internal and external variables in selecting optimal strategies in case studies and in a business simulation.
  5. Evaluate the nature and application of ethical principles and social responsibility in the creation and execution of business strategy.
  6. Function as a member of an effective management team and create optimal strategies in a business simulation exercise.

MGMT 651  Integrative Capstone: Internship in Strategic Management  (4 Credits)  

This capstone course is a field-based internship designed to develop and hone the practical application skills of a Business Management major. The course requires students to integrate the knowledge and skills gained from other courses in the program and to demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge to new subject matter and practical situations. Students apply for an internship at a self-selected site and negotiate the terms of the internship experience with a site supervisor under the auspices of their Granite State College mentor. The internship requires documented evidence of eighty hours of supervised experience and practice in a field setting where management-related knowledge and skills are applied. Students will also be required to submit professional documents such as a cover letter, resume, and professional portfolio as part of the course. NOTE: Registration for this course, an internship, is by permission of the Office of Academic Affairs. Early registration deadlines may apply.

Prerequisite(s): CRIT 602 Conducting Critical Inquiry, IDIS 601 Interdisciplinary Seminar, and all major requirements must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Academic Advisor approval is required for registration to be processed. NOTE: Student who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Apply knowledge and gain experience of systems, operations, ethics and roles fundamental to the field, in the context of an individually developed project within a supervised field-setting.
  2. Develop professional documents to promote an individual's brand.
  3. Understand the internship site's mission and identify how the business or organization serve its designated clientele.
  4. Acquire an experientially-based knowledge foundation to inform and guide their future career choices in the management field.
  5. Follow Granite State College policy that all research activities which involve human participants, regardless of the level of risk foreseen, require review and written approval by the College's Institutional Review Board prior to the initiation of the activity.
  6. Understand the importance of assessment and evaluation in providing service and acquire knowledge of quality assurance as represented in the internship setting.
  7. Present and discuss a summative project to articulate the internship, conclusions, and reflections on the integration of knowledge achieved through the completion of the experience.

MGMT 653  Integrative: Leadership  (4 Credits)  

This course guides participants in developing lifelong learning skills for leadership that apply to any organizational level in a wide variety of environments. Both historical and current leadership theory and practice are explored. By taking an active leadership role in this course, students examine the issues, challenges, and practical skills of leadership in today’s workplace. Presentations, team activities, reflection, interviewing, and feedback are core developmental components of this course. Students will also apply their knowledge of leadership to the field of allied health by completing a course project.

Prerequisite(s): CRIT 602 Advanced Critical Analysis and Strategic Thinking, IDIS 601 Interdisciplinary Seminar, and all major requirements must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Academic Advisor approval is required for registration to be processed. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency as a self-directed learner by choosing an appropriate topic and developing specific learning outcomes reflective of the general learning outcomes for the integrative capstone.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in the methods of inquiry pertinent to the primary discipline of the Individualized Studies major.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of information resources for the primary discipline of the Individualized Studies major.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the existing body of knowledge pertinent to the topic and the theoretical framework upon which it is built.
  5. Reflect on and synthesize prior learning in the major with current research or scholarship in the field to reach a new, higher level of understanding.

MGMT 660  Integrative: Applied Studies in Management  (4 Credits)  

This capstone course for Applied Studies in Management builds on all previous work in both the applied studies foundation and business management. Students synthesize their knowledge of an applied field and management theory to develop and implement effective managerial strategies in their own field of professional interest by completing a course project. Students explore current research in the field of management to meet their personal professional goals and goals of their organizations.

Prerequisite(s): CRIT 602 Conducting Critical Inquiry, IDIS 601 Interdisciplinary Seminar, and all major requirements must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. Academic Advisor approval is required for registration to be processed. NOTE: Students who were admitted to the college before Fall 2019 and have remained active in their original catalog year are not required to take IDIS 601.
MGMT 805  Organizational Behavior  (3 Credits)  

This course reviews the fundamental concepts of organizational behavior in the context of an increasingly diverse and evolving society. The study of organizations encompasses several key knowledge areas essential to today’s managers and leaders: Social diversity, perceptions and behaviors, culture, team and group dynamics, conflict and negotiation, decision-making, motivational factors, communication methods, change management, and organizational design and structure. Through various modes of engagement, these areas are analyzed to better understand and identify the influential components of organizational behavior as they relate to effectiveness and sustainability.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Identify key theories, models, and management styles as found in an organizational setting.
  2. Analyze an organization and make behavioral recommendations for development and effectiveness by utilizing critical thinking skills.
  3. Apply theories and concepts related to the decision-making process in various organizational settings.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to conduct research and formulate a synthesized literature review to form conclusions on a specified topic related to organizational behavior.
  5. Establish a team-oriented goal that requires communication, inclusion, problem-solving, decision-making, and implementation strategies.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to comprehend and articulate key concepts relating to both individuals and groups in an organizational context.

MGMT 810  Marketing Management  (3 Credits)  

This course will concentrate on an analytical approach to the study of marketing problems. Examine the influence of the marketplace and the marketing environment on marketing decision-making: the determination of the organization's products, prices, channels, and communication strategies; and the organization's system for planning and controlling its marketing effort.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Assess market opportunities by analyzing customers, competitors, collaborators, context, and the strengths and weaknesses of a company.
  2. Develop effective marketing strategies to achieve organizational objectives.
  3. Design a strategy implementation program to maximize its chance of success.
  4. Communicate and defend your recommendations and critically examine and build upon the recommendations of your classmates both quantitatively and qualitatively.

MGMT 815  Financial Management for Nonprofit Organizations  (3 Credits)  

Nonprofit management is becoming a recognized specialty, and there are a growing number of individuals and entities specializing in nonprofit financial management as well. With this growth in numbers comes a comparable growth in the demand for sophisticated management. No longer is it enough just for one's financial records to be in order; one must be able to demonstrate good financial systems to meet all the other rising demands on today's nonprofit.

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Demonstrate the capacity to understand nonprofit management from a financial leadership viewpoint and to act consistently with that understanding;
  2. Demonstrate mastery of discipline specific concepts in the areas of ethics, governance, policy and financial management;
  3. Apply financial management concepts in a variety of nonprofit settings.

MGMT 824  Financial Management  (3 Credits)  

This course focuses on managerial finance from both domestic and international perspectives. Topics include valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure and financial leverage, long-term financing decisions, cost of capital, mergers and acquisitions, international finance, and risk management. Students use spreadsheets and financial calculators to apply course concepts to real world examples. PREREQUSITE: ACCT 810 Management Accounting

View Course Outcomes:

  1. Determine the present value of a range of financial instruments, and validate investment decisions
  2. Calculate the cost of capital for an investment or business
  3. Apply the basic capital budgeting techniques
  4. Assess the impact of risk on capital budgeting analysis
  5. Interpret the capital structure decisions made by management
  6. Analyze the dividend policy decision
  7. Explain the use of hybrid financing
  8. Apply derivative instruments and risk management principles

MGMT 825  Corporate and Social Accountability  (3 Credits)  
MGMT 830  Changing Economics  (3 Credits)  

Current issues in economics and their relationship to the achievement of organizational goals will be discussed. The impact of economic reality on real organizations will be analyzed.

MGMT 835  Decision Analysis for Managers  (3 Credits)  

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the methodology of decision analysis using computer based techniques and systems analysis. Concepts of modeling, probability, and choice will be introduced. The philosophy and detailed methods involved in decision analysis will be reviewed. The methods reviewed will be applied to address routine and special business decisions.

MGMT 850  Strategic Management Integrative Capstone  (3 Credits)  

The capstone course brings together the knowledge and skills needed to be successful in the global marketplace. The focus of the course is on defining and researching a practical business problem or entrepreneurial opportunity. The research project provides the opportunity to utilize strategy, research skills, analytical tools and models, as well as decision sciences with a culminating business project that can be of strategic benefit to the student and/or a current organization. After documenting the above, students will discuss and defend their project orally. PREREQUISITE: All required coursework must be completed.